Where Can You Hide a Nanny Cam?

Todd Morris, CEO of BrickHouse Security, hesitantly presses play and sits back down, bracing himself for the worst. As working parents, Todd and his wife had no choice but to entrust their then one-year-old son to a nanny, and now comes the moment of truth: playing back the nanny camera video. Will she be everything she said she says she was? Caring, helpful, playful? Or will she be like those horror stories you see on the news?

Thankfully, What the Morris’ found was a happy scene; the nanny was hugging and kissing their child, caring for him as if he were her own. But what if the scene hadn’t been so pleasant? Can a nanny caught in an incriminating predicament sue the parents for video taping her without her knowledge?

If a parent or family chooses to use a nanny camera, they are absolutely within their rights. A person is allowed to use a hidden camera within their own home, on the terms that what a guest does in this person’s home is considered the home owner’s business. That means that when you’re a guest in someone else’s home, the reasonable expectation of privacy is limited.

Since the main areas of the home, apart from bathrooms, are not considered private, the homeowners can record without a nanny’s consent. You can’t use a nanny camera where there is an expectation of privacy, such as the bathroom, and if a nanny happens to live with you, the bedroom. Dressing rooms, locker rooms, and tanning salons also qualify as private, and nowadays even lunch rooms or employee break rooms have been deemed private by some states and cannot be monitored by video surveillance. But remember, you don’t have an expectation of privacy in the public areas of a home that isn’t yours.

Unlike audio recording, you are not obligated to inform your nanny that you are video taping her. But keep in mind that alerting your nanny that you are recording them in your home can act as a deterrent and keep the nanny on her best behavior. Businesses are also allowed to monitor employees using a surveillance system, especially when used in a public space. A person or business owner is allowed to hide a surveillance camera, but always within the realm of decency.

It is federally illegal to record audio in your nanny camera. You can’t record sound, even if you want to. Audio recordings on video violate the federal wiretapping laws.

“A lot of people want audio, especially when it comes to watching their baby” said Gok Tezgor of BrickHouse Security. “It’s still illegal. There cannot be audio for any type of hidden camera.”

But nanny cameras aren’t just used to monitor the behaviors of nannies. “Its a multi-use device,” says Tezgor. “Around 80% of our customers are buying cameras called “nanny cameras” and re-purposing them for other uses. I see a lot of people who worry that their landlords are coming into their homes while they are at work. They think the landlords are  sifting through their private things, so they’re using the nanny camera to bust them,” says Gok.

So keep the guidelines fresh in your mind if you’re planning on hiding a camera in your home or business; it will keep you from breaking the law in your attempts to enforce it.

About the author  ⁄ BrickHouse Security

BrickHouse Security is the industry's premier supplier of security and surveillance solutions. As a recognized authority in GPS tracking, hidden cameras, employee monitoring and compliance, video surveillance and counter surveillance, we help our customers use technology to get the clarity they need. We proudly serve consumers, businesses of all sizes and the law enforcement community. When you need to know, BrickHouse has the answers.

  • happynanny

    Wish these products would give a little info. on…
    HOW CAN YOU BE SURE YOUR NANNY IS GOOD?

    *HERE ARE SOME SUGGESTIONS:
    *Call to check references yourself- don’t rely on nanny agencies to give you all the details. Call and speak to the references directly, many times they will be more upfront with you as a parent, than a nanny agency.
    *Ask to see originals of the nannies: driver’s license, CPR/1St Aid. Cards/Diplomas (a good nanny will be proud to show her accomplishments!)
    *Call home at different times during the day to check in.
    If your nanny often sounds frazzled or upset or if the children are usually crying- that should be a warning sign.
    *Drop by at unexpected times.
    *Have neighbors, friends, or relatives drop by unannounced while the nanny is working.
    *Ask your child’s teachers what their first-hand feedback is regarding what they see while the child is with the nanny.
    * Meet up with the nanny during the day for lunch or at your child’s classes/ OR~ have someone else you know have playdates with them, and then give you feedback on how they feel the nanny and your child interact.
    *See how your child responds to the nanny-
    see how nanny responds to the baby-
    Are they happy to see each other? (I know there can be certain separation anxiety issues, but on a whole, is the child comfortable with the nanny?)
    *How does your home look at the end of the day? Is the nanny able and capable of completing her required duties each day? Does the nanny take care and pride with your child’s things? or does she just throw them around?
    *Communicate and let your nanny know she/he can talk openly with you at anytime.
    *Have the nanny keep a daily detailed written child/nanny log, it does not have to be fancy, a note book works well, with a run down of your child(ren)’s day. It will help greatly to open the lines of communication as well as help you keep an on-going record of your child’s day. In addition it will offer the opportunity to write notes back and forth to each other on various issues/topics/reminders.
    *Have the NANNY video tape and take pictures.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    A serious nanny will:
    ~ Continue her involvement in child-related education
    ~Keep current her CPR and 1st Aid Certification
    ~Be a member of a nanny support group.
    http://www.nannyalliancenyandnj.com
    ~Be a member of a nanny organization, such as, the National Association for Nanny Care (NANC) http://www.nannycredential.org/page/page/4225838.htm
    ~or~
    National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC).
    http://njaeyc.org/

    I feel if a parent has a bad feeling regarding the care their child is receiving from the nanny they need to act on that and go with their gut immediately. That is why I strongly feel that families should only hire nannies with at least two full years of nanny experience and stellar references if their children are less than 4 years old.
    *Other good signs to be certain your nanny and your child are a good match are:
    ~Is your child thriving under the nannies care?
    ~Is the nanny enthusiastic to share new developments and milestones your child has reached or gives you feedback on how to help your child?

    Frequent communication and being involved in the nannies day will help to ensure a healthy relationship.

  • happynanny

    Wish these products would give a little info. on…HOW CAN YOU BE SURE YOUR NANNY IS GOOD?*HERE ARE SOME SUGGESTIONS:*Call to check references yourself- don't rely on nanny agencies to give you all the details. Call and speak to the references directly, many times they will be more upfront with you as a parent, than a nanny agency.*Ask to see originals of the nannies: driver’s license, CPR/1St Aid. Cards/Diplomas (a good nanny will be proud to show her accomplishments!) *Call home at different times during the day to check in.If your nanny often sounds frazzled or upset or if the children are usually crying- that should be a warning sign. *Drop by at unexpected times. *Have neighbors, friends, or relatives drop by unannounced while the nanny is working.*Ask your child’s teachers what their first-hand feedback is regarding what they see while the child is with the nanny.* Meet up with the nanny during the day for lunch or at your child's classes/ OR~ have someone else you know have playdates with them, and then give you feedback on how they feel the nanny and your child interact.*See how your child responds to the nanny-see how nanny responds to the baby-Are they happy to see each other? (I know there can be certain separation anxiety issues, but on a whole, is the child comfortable with the nanny?)*How does your home look at the end of the day? Is the nanny able and capable of completing her required duties each day? Does the nanny take care and pride with your child's things? or does she just throw them around?*Communicate and let your nanny know she/he can talk openly with you at anytime. *Have the nanny keep a daily detailed written child/nanny log, it does not have to be fancy, a note book works well, with a run down of your child(ren)’s day. It will help greatly to open the lines of communication as well as help you keep an on-going record of your child's day. In addition it will offer the opportunity to write notes back and forth to each other on various issues/topics/reminders.*Have the NANNY video tape and take pictures.~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~A serious nanny will:~ Continue her involvement in child-related education~Keep current her CPR and 1st Aid Certification~Be a member of a nanny support group. http://www.nannyalliancenyandnj.com~Be a member of a nanny organization, such as, the National Association for Nanny Care (NANC) http://www.nannycredential.org/page/page/422583… ~or~ National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC).http://njaeyc.org/ I feel if a parent has a bad feeling regarding the care their child is receiving from the nanny they need to act on that and go with their gut immediately. That is why I strongly feel that families should only hire nannies with at least two full years of nanny experience and stellar references if their children are less than 4 years old.*Other good signs to be certain your nanny and your child are a good match are:~Is your child thriving under the nannies care? ~Is the nanny enthusiastic to share new developments and milestones your child has reached or gives you feedback on how to help your child?Frequent communication and being involved in the nannies day will help to ensure a healthy relationship.

  • http://personalprotectionandmore.com Self Defense Weapons

    Nanny cams are a great source for home security. More and more people should be looking into purchasing these cams as it's amazing the footing you wil be able to capture. Hopefully it will be good as you describe in your letter. Doing background checks, etc. are all great things but it won't tell you whether or not the nanny or babysitter isn't going to harm your child. It's like renting an apartment or house to someone who seems very fitting. You did the background check everything pans out so you rent to them. Next thing you know you are convicting them due to non-rent payments, they destroyed your home. These are the kinds of things you won't know by doing background checks. Everything always appears greater on paper. Finding a good nanny or babysitter these days is not easy and if you are a concerned parent and want to really know how your child is being taken care of these cameras fit the bill.

  • http://spy-tools.blogspot.com/ Spy Tools

    There are a lot covert pinhole cameras available in the market. I think using toys as nanny spy cam is also a good idea.

  • Tom

    Bull. You can hide a nanny cam in a bathroom if a nurse or caregiver is in there alone, with door closed bathing a severely disabled or elderly person who can’t talk or defend themself. You have every right to do this with reasonable suspicion there is something going on. Abusive Home health nurses better watch themselves because the days of getting away with slapping someone’s grandma when nobody’s looking or shoving hot food into a severely disabled person’s mouth when they think nobody is watching is coming to an end in the age of hidden cameras. it’s about time. We need to weed out these disgusting caregivers and despicable nurses.

  • Jennifer

    I just found this and am glad to see it. I’ve got autistic/developmentally disabled twins, now 21. Have had scary experiences with staff support. And am especially fearful for the son who cannot read, write or speak. Tom is right. There are troubled folks in this field that go unchecked. I’m looking for a way to geo tag my son so I I know where he is if he gets lost. Also looking for video surveillance for him and my other son, his twin, at home. In the future, I’ll be moving out and they’ll live here with supports. Anyone out there know about a good video surveillance, like nanny cam? Video only. Pa laws are strict. Thanks. Jen.

  • http://eye-veillance.com/beta_1/ eye-veillance

    I was looking for post on nanny cams and I think I found the best one. seriously we nee to use nanny cams for take care our family and watch kids.