screenshot_01It seems that for U.S. troops, the war on terrorism never takes a break, even during the holidays. The U.S. is employing 24 new Hawker Beechcraft four-man twin-propeller planes, with the first expected to arrive this week during Christmas.

These high tech planes will provide ground troops with a full set of eavesdropping and surveillance tools, including the ability to record still images and video, and send them directly to ground troops. Ground troops are being equipped with portable computers that let them view these images and video.

According to Jeffrey Richelson, author of the “U.S. Intelligence Community” these planes are equipped with sensors that that can monitor insurgents’ conversations and help pinpoint their location.

“It’s a lot of intelligence and dissemination capability in a small package,” Richelson said. The planes, with self- protective equipment, are “also clearly designed for a combat environment.”

On that note, we hope that these planes help keep our troops safe in the coming year. And we also want to send out a Seasons Greetings to all our troops stationed overseas, and their families waiting for them at home.

(Via Bloomberg News)

Read More →

war-on-terrorA total of 14 Americans were killed have been killed after three helicopters crashed in Afghanistan. This has been the deadliest day of the U.S. mission in Afghanistan in more than four years. News of the deaths came as President Obama prepared for the sixth conference to discuss the future of the war with his national security team.

There were 10 Americans killed in the first crash along with seven other troops and three drug enforcement agents. There were also eleven soldiers, one civilian and 14 Afghans inured during the attack. In another incident, two American helicopters holding soldiers collided with each other killing four, and injuring two. It was the heaviest single-day loss of life since June 28, 2005, when 16 U.S. troops on a special forces helicopter died while they were shot down buy insurgents. These events also marked the first ever D.E.A. officer deaths since the project began in 2005.

Read More →