article-1243989-07e3d4e3000005dc-92_634x286Lorrain Andrews, a severely disabled women in Bristol, England, knew something was awry when money from her purse kept going missing. Because Lorraine can’t even get out of her bed without help, she knew that she would need help to catch the thief in the act. As a result, she set up a surveillance camera inside her home.

The camera ended up recording her aid, Jane Hoy, stealing from her purse and rugsack a total of 8 times in just a period of a little over two weeks. Lorrain suspects that during the past year or so, over 2000 pounds have already been stolen from her.

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radar-vs-gps While driving down the A4174 highway near Bristol, on November 28th 2008, Gareth Powell was clocked going 61 mph in a 50 mph zone by a police officer with a speed gun. The police officer wrote him out a ticket that Powell was positive he didn’t deserve.

He said: “I’m an extremely careful driver and I was certain I hadn’t broken the law.”

At the time, Gareth had a GPS navigation system in his car that was not only tracking him but could also tell how fast he was going. After contacting Navman Wireless (his GPS device’s manufacturer) and getting the records of how fast he was going at the time, he was able to provide proof that he really was within the speed limit. It turns out that Powell had been moving at 48 mph. In court he managed to have the director of Navman Wireless IT, Barry Neill, serve as an expert witness to back him up:
“The GPS fix on Gareth’s vehicle from the tracking system was excellent when he was clocked by the speed gun… The eight satellites locating his vehicle were advantageously positioned. Under good conditions, GPS tracking technology is accurate to within three meters.”
Thanks to the GPS navigation system in Powell’s car, he was not just able to beat a speeding ticket, but he also managed to prove that GPS devices can be more accurate then the speed guns used by the police officers.

(Via RoadTransport)

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hmv_1A British police officer was put to shame when he was caught on a store surveillance camera stealing video games by stuffing them behind his security vest.

The video depicts officer Peter Cokell browsing amongst the shelves of HMV, a popular video game retailer, and taking a few Ps3 games and stuffing them behind his police issued stab vest.

When asked of the crimes officer Cokell denied all charges stating “I tried my best to be inconspicuous to the general members of the pubic so that they would not form the wrong impression of what I may or may not have been trying to do with my trousers,” the judge, however, was not sold.

With clear video footage of officer Cokell taking the video games and leaving the store with them in tow, the judge found him guilty of the crime. Sentencing has not been issued yet but officer Cokell resigned from the Avon and Somerset police force in June when the official investigation into the theft began.

(Via The Tech Herald)

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