iwormJailbroken iPhone users in the Netherlands beware, a new worm is luring itself by redirecting users from the ING bank web site. When users visit the bank’s home page they are redirected by the worm which leaves them vulnerable to criminals that can capture their banking log-in information. Security experts at F-Secure are also warning that the worm can potentially turn infected iPhones into a “bonnet”, which is a network of compromised computers at the mercy of hackers or cybercriminals that can be accessed and controlled without the permission of the user. The worm can also be easily spread from one jailbroken iPhone to another when the jailbroken iPhones are connected to the same wireless internet connection.

Although this iPhone Worm is far from the first iPhone security threat to come out recently, Mikko Hypponen of F-Secure says that this is worm is the first seriously malicious virus for the iPhone. “There’s a clear financial motive behind it,” he told the BBC. “It’s fairly isolated and specific to the Netherlands, but it is capable of spreading.”

(Via the Telegraph)

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worm_chomping_on_computer_hg_whtRecently, some of the best security minds in the world have started joining forces to fight an evil called the Conficker Worm. The Conficker Worm is a computer virus that targets a flaw in Microsoft’s operating system and then spreads rapidly through other computers connected to the same network.

To date the Conficker virus has infected at least 5 million computers. After the virus infects the computers, the hacker can control the computer systems and transform the systems in to a “botnet army.” The botnet army can be used to syphon banking information or to flood government servers knocking them off line. In July, Conficker knocked out parts of Manchester City Council’s IT system costing the council £1.5 million in total. Similarly in January, the French Navy had to quarantine its computer network after it was infected with Conficker. This forced aircrafts at several air bases to stay grounded.

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chick-at-computerDozens of people experience computers hacks everyday spanning from stolen Facebook login credentials that result in embarrassing status updates, to something more serious like bank or identity theft. Stealing these passwords used to be reserved for computer savvy hackers or psycho ex girlfriends, but apparently now all you need is a $100 cash to hack an e-mail account. A website called YourHackerz.com claims that, with the exception of .gov and .edu, they can get the password and effectively hack into any e-mail account. And if you use the same password for multiple accounts, you could be in serious trouble.

Although hacking into someone’s e-mail is considered a federal offense, it is treated like a misdemeanor as long as no other laws are broken. Orin Kerr, a George Washington University law professor and former computer crimes attorney, stated “The Feds don’t usually have the resources to investigate and prosecute misdemeanors. And part of the reason is that normally it’s hard to know when an account has been compromised, because e-mail snooping doesn’t leave a trace.”

However, there are some simple steps that every person can take to help make sure that they are not so easily defeated. Simple things such as keeping passwords secret and consistently changing passwords can greatly decrease the probability of getting hacked. Also, one should refrain from using the same password for more than one account. Using a combination of numbers and letters can also increase password strength, making it harder to figure out and crack. Simple preventative measures is all it takes to help keep yourself a little safer in today’s technological world.

Via (Wtop.com)


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