217-suicidalMany states are deliberating whether or not it would be worth-while for them to use GPS tracking systems to monitor the whereabouts of domestic violence offenders who have orders of protection against them. It has been argued by many state governments that often these orders of protection are violated thus resulting in the deaths of many victims.

On the other hand, some lawmakers argue that the GPS systems are likely to help in some cases, but not all. They also argue that the GPS systems would come at a significant cost to tax payers. Furthermore, some states argue that because of these high costs, the thought of using this new technology is simply a delusion of grandeur. Meanwhile countless numbers of abused women have been relating stories of the protection orders being violated by their ex-partners. In one tragic case, a woman named Leigh Ann Olson told the story of how her ex-husband violated his protection order and fatally shot their five year old daughter Makayla, before shooting himself.

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rhianna_02Last month, Texas joined a coalition of seventeen states that protect victims of domestic violence and interpersonal violence by using GPS electronic monitoring systems. This tracking system enables authorities to both monitor a convicted offender and to realize when he or she goes to certain locations of interests, such as a victim’s home or place of employment.

Diane Rosenfeld, who is a Harvard Law lecturer and a very important figure in the campaign to get GPS electronic monitoring used in many states, stated in an interview that the system can be a key tool in the fight against domestic violence due to its ability to establish boundaries when they are broken, and because warning could be given to the victim if need be.

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