marijuana2Police discovered over 10,000 marijuana plants in both Idaho and Oregon with the help of GPS tracking.

Detectives in Ada and Canyon County noticed that there were huge amounts of plastic pipes and water emitters being purchased in cash from local distributors. Suspecting production of an illegal substance, investigators planted GPS trackers on the goods and followed the suspects to their marijuana grow operations where they uncovered 6,000 marijuana plants.

Using similar tactics, police were also able to locate another 4,000 marijuana plants in a remote region of Oregon, apparently connected to this particular grow operation. Authorities arrested three men and charged them in connection to serious marijuana grows in both Idaho and Oregon. Police value the marijuana at millions of dollars.

(Via ABC6 Boise)

Read More →

gps-mapGPS loggers and trackers have become really popular lately, and for good reason too. They make it easy to track where your loved ones, assets, and vehicles are at all times. You can place a small GPS tracker in a briefcase in case it gets lost, into a package to make sure it gets to where it’s supposed to go, use a spy GPS for a car a teen your concerned about is going to use, or you can give it to a loved one as a security measure to make sure that they can be found if they are ever lost and in distress.

Read More →

towtrucksSomeone snuck into a Fort Lauderdale towing company’s parking lot in the dead of night. Someone believed they could be reckless, and that they were above the law when they stole two tow trucks. Someone believed that they would never get caught. What these someone’s didn’t understand was that GPS tracking could and would put an end to their hair-brained schemes.

Fort Lauderdale police arrested two men on Saturday for the theft of the tow trucks. Both were equipped with GPS tracking devices, which had been used to track all movement of the tow trucks during the time they were stolen. A number of stolen items, including car rims, were found in the suspects collection of goods. Police did not immediately identify the men.

Jason Parrett, owner of the Fort Lauderdale repossession truck company First Response Towing and Recovery, said the GPS tracking units were crucial in finding the missing wreckers.

“Without it we wouldn’t have found the trucks,” said Parrett, who has all three trucks in his fleet hooked up with GPS technology.

Parrett said that he was alerted by an employee early Saturday that the trucks were missing and reacted to the situation by pulling up their locations on his wife’s BlackBerry, which is linked to their GPS units to give the company maximum oversight.

After GPS maps showed Ford F-450′s in Oakland Park and the Lauderdale Manors section of the city, Parrett’s drivers were able to find one F-450 abandoned in Oakland Park. When the other was located on Northwest 13th Avenue, the driver observed a man taking the wrecker. The truck was followed by the driver and eventually abandoned when the culprit realized he was being followed.

The GPS system’s activity report was so efficient that it basically did all the police’s work for them, showing where the trucks had been, places where they had been parked for extended periods and how fast they had been driven.This information was used to arrest the culprits on the 1700 block of Northwest 13th Avenue, a location listed in the report.

“The detailed activity reports in these are disgustingly accurate,” Parrett said of the system, which cost him $300 to install and $20 a month for airtime for each of his three trucks.

(Via Miami Herald)

Read More →

*Aug 17 - 00:05*22-year-old violinist Hahn-Bin Yoo spent this morning performing Chopin and Kreisler for investigators after they helped find a $500,000 violin he left in the back seat of a New York cab. Yoo had spent Sunday in the Hamptons and ended his night practicing on the borrowed violin at Lincoln Center. Afterwards he got into Dalbir Singh’s cab were he left the 19th century violin in the back seat.

“I was exhausted,” the South Korean native said. “I completely forgot about it.”

After dialing 311 he was, by chance, patched through to one of the cities top detectives Ming Li. Li contacted the Taxi and Limousine Commission and using their GPS tracking systems they were able to determine which cab Yoo had traveled in. Within minutes they were able to contact Dalbir Singh and retrieve the violin. When questioned about the violin Singh simply said  “He is lucky, he was my last fare.” Yoo is actually the city’s second lost violin case in eight days. Gregor Kitzis told police about a pair of violins he accidentally left on the No. 1 train last Sunday. They have yet to be found.

While we have all had the experience of leaving something behind in a cab from time to time, it sounds like more people should be investing in a GPS tracker to attach onto their more valuable possessions, because you might not be so fortunate to recover your items the way Yoo did.

(Via NY Daily News)


Read More →

689095Previously used by high profile government agencies and rich biollionaires, GPS tracking devices are become more accessible and making their way to small towns across America.

Pioneering this endeavor is the homey town of North Brunswick, New Jersey where officials hope to install GPS tracking systems in all of their government owned township cars.

Read More →

momo_catgirl_3Money can’t buy you love- unless you have an iPhone.

A new application has surfaced that provides you with a virtual catgirl girlfriend, named Momo.  Yes, that is right, this portable girlfriend is there for you any time of the day, waiting to love you right in your pocket.  Using new technology, creators designed Momo to express emotions depending on the time of day.  Another, feature utilizes the iPhone’s built in GPS tracking device to let Momo know when you are out and when you are home.  Just like any girlfriend- you’ll get a moodier, and suspicious Momo when you are out late into the night, and a happier, bubblier side if you spend the night in…with your phone.

Read More →

26489078781Mumbling into the microphone is the best that she can do to save her five children and herself- little does she know that it’s too late. The dizziness weighs her head down- she is barely able to prop her ear against the phone. Within a matter of seconds it is all over; the damage is incomprehensible, and irreparable.

These are only speculative snapshots of the last moments in the car of Diane Schuler. There is no way of knowing exactly what happened in those last moments. What we do know is this: she was driving on the wrong wide of the Taconic Highway and within seconds crashed into an innocent, unsuspecting driver, taking the lives of the people in both cars. The aftermath of the tragic story is a turbulent ocean of emotions and there is a tall wave, about to come crashing down, asking how it could be been prevented.

Read More →

otlawgpsThe New York State Court of Appeals recently issued a ruling baring police from tracking the cars of criminal suspects with GPS systems unless a warrant is first obtained from a judge. The ruling was set in motion by a case in Albany County where the state police believed a man may have been committing burglaries. The GPS device was used to place the suspects car at the scene of a shopping center burglary. However, Chief Judge John Lippman ruled that this type of GPS tracking violated the state Constitution.

In the majority opinion, Lippman wrote that “It is quite clear that this would not, and indeed, realistically could not be done without GPS and this dragnet use of of this technology at the sole discretion of law enforcement authorities to pry into the details of people’s daily lives is not consistent with the values at the core of the state Constitution’s prohibition against unreasonable searches.”

A New York State attorney who had been involved in a similar case with a man who was tracked by a GPS device praised the verdict as a strong one. William Tendy, a native of Poughkeepsie, stated that “The decision makes good sense; it’s well-reasoned.” He also said that the ruling was a good sign, as law enforcement agencies are usually believed to be slow in addressing advancements in technology that are seen as eroding citizens privacy.

Ulster County D.A. Holley Carnight, who said that GPS devices are sometimes used in law enforcement cases in the county, particularly in drug investigations, was one law enforcement official who disagreed with the Court of Appeals ruling. He believes that GPS tracking does not give enough information on drivers to be an infringement on privacy.

“It doesn’t tell you who the driver is or what he’s doing, so I don’t think the situation is as sinister as the majority seems to believe,” Carnight said.

The New York State Court of Appeals may have the state’s citizens best interests at heart, but with this ruling, law enforcement may face a major set back in fighting crime. The vehicle GPS tracking systems that law enforcement uses in both New York and other states at this moment in time are very simple and have a clear goal: to track and stop suspected criminals and in doing so, protect communities. Our pinion is that there is no “Big Brother” effect at work here with the trackers. Rather, it is just law enforcement serving and protecting, as it’s their duty to do so.

Read More →

airportcopsThe buzz of people waiting to board the plane drowns out the heavy breathing of the suspicious looking people clutching their fists hoping to release some tension in their body.  Their darting eyes screen the room for any threats as they walk through security.  They hold their breath praying that nothing goes wrong and close their eyes as they take their first step under the beams of metal. Then it comes, the beautiful, refreshing sound of absolutely nothing.  No alarms.  No flashing lights.  Plain and utterly priceless nothing.  Ignorant is everyone to the fact that another drug dealer just successfully smuggled more drugs into the country.

According to an article written in Stuff.co.nz,  an astounding 80% of drugs smuggled into New Zealand go undetected every year, as reported by the National Drug Intelligence Bureau, and changes need to be made to substantially lower that number.

Authorities are trying to respond to the surprisingly high number of successful transportation of illegal drugs into New Zealand every year by implementing a new technology.  While the exact methodology of how these devices could be used to prevent drug trafficking cannot be released, authorities have confirmed that they need to implement GPS tracking devices in order to track intercepted shipments. However, there are some obstacles to overcome before any real progress can be made.

Read More →

Grandma’s new kicks are not only stylish but they could also save her life. A new shoe embedded with a live GPS tracking chip is becoming a hit with Alzheimer patients and their families. Avoid the angst associated with a wandering family member by checking in on their real-time GPS location online, from your cell phone, or gpsshoe2even on Facebook.

“This product could not only save lives but potentially save governments billion in search and rescue operations,” said Andrew Carle, a professor at George Mason and an adviser for the project.

This GPS tracking unit is part of a significant line of assisted-living products offered for the treatment of Alzheimer’s patients, from sensor systems to pill boxes that remind patients of medication. The market for assisted-living products is growing fast and shows no sings of stagnation soon, as the market for microchip-based technology alone is estimated at $5 billion.

Read More →