Mothers who send their children to school on the school bus system are often concerned with the safety of their child. Well parents in the Pike County School system can breathe even easier than most. Park County School have partnered up with Sprint Nextel and Telenav Track to install GPS cell phones on all of the county school buses.

Tom Hicks of the PCS transportation department stated “Over the past few years, buses have been hijacked in other places. this system helps protect our buses.”

According to Hicks, Sprint provided the equipment and it was all installed right before school started. Through this system county officials have the ability to see the exact mileage of the buses as well as their exact location and speeds.

Read More →

115-0_62_gps_320A Massachusetts court ruled today that sex offenders convicted before 2006 could not be forced to wear GPS monitoring devices. The court ruled that retroactively forcing sex offenders to wear the tracking devices violates state and federal constitutions.Vice president of Community Voices, Debbie Savoia, described the ruling as a “slap in the face” to sex crime victims as well as a threat to public safety.

Read More →

170427_old_man_walkingIndianapolis state legislature has begun discussions as to whether or not they should use GPS tracking systems on adults with dementia and other mental diseases that cause them to wander. The topic was brought to question due to recently passed legislation that began the Silver Alert program which involves the public in finding missing endangered adults. If passed, the law would require for adults with diseases like dementia to wear the GPS devices to help ensure their safety.

According to Michael Sullivan, director of public policy and advocacy for the Alzheimer’s Association Greater Indiana chapter, “There was a lot of concern by state police and broadcasters about how often there would be a Silver Alert.” For this reason lawmakers are calling for a study to determine weather or not the GPS devices should be made mandatory. Stephen Smith, president of the Indiana Health Care Association, called the proposal “overkill.”

Read More →

Well it’s summer, that time of year when Boy Scout troops go off into the woods, Dad drags the family on a cross-country trip, and teenagers celebrate their freedom from responsibility by going off into the woods and doing irresponsible things. As the number of campers out there increase in number over the next few months, we here at BrickHouse Security want you to be safe while you are out camping and to have the ability to take full advantage of your surroundings. Here are 10 must-have gadgets that will make your camping experience one to remember.

Read More →

rhianna_02Last month, Texas joined a coalition of seventeen states that protect victims of domestic violence and interpersonal violence by using GPS electronic monitoring systems. This tracking system enables authorities to both monitor a convicted offender and to realize when he or she goes to certain locations of interests, such as a victim’s home or place of employment.

Diane Rosenfeld, who is a Harvard Law lecturer and a very important figure in the campaign to get GPS electronic monitoring used in many states, stated in an interview that the system can be a key tool in the fight against domestic violence due to its ability to establish boundaries when they are broken, and because warning could be given to the victim if need be.

Read More →

whitebark-pine-trunks-702938-swWe’ve seen GPS tracking systems being used for some very unusual purposes, but this is the first time we’ve seen GPS used to help save the environment, and in this case – trees. Foresters in Jackson, Wyoming, have decided they will begin using GPS to track the damage to whitebark pine trees being killed by beetles. U.S. Forest Service officials are using a budget of $150,00 to start the survey of beetle damage in the Bridger-Teton National Forest. The forest officially contains about 400,000 acres of whitebark pine, but the species has begin to decline due to beetle attacks. The process will begin with mapping through an aerial survey, with the survey then being used to map the pine population and to help lay out the area that will be used for the GPS. This work should be completed by next spring. Foresters specifically want to know where the damage is worst, and why some pockets of pines appear to be unaffected.

Read More →