Looking at the title of this post, you might be thinking, “How in the world can almost every internet user be considered a criminal?” Well, if the law that the the U.S. Department of Justice wants to get passed actually does go through, every person that ever violated a website’s terms of service (such as using a fake name, e-mail, or lying about personal details like age) would be considered a felon.

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Secure Socket Layer (SSL) is the encryption that is used to protect sensitive online data from hackers and interception by third parties. Normally this form of encryption is used for sensitive data such as e-mail, Facebook and bank login information, but thanks to Google’s new security update, your Google search terms are now protected as well.

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With so much cybercrime and identity fraud going on thanks to Internet malware and maliciousness, the U.S. government is eyeing a way to create unified online identities available for all web users. But don’t panic just yet, the purpose of this verified identity isn’t to track users’ surfing habits, but to cut down on identity theft and fraudulent online purchases.

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Have you ever noticed that when you log into your web account on a different computer that you still get the same advertisements? That’s no coincidence. What’s really happening is that advertisers are tracking the activity of all the web identities you use, and then link that browsing history to wherever you log in with those accounts; basically tracking your actions on whatever computer you use.

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According to a recent study carried out in the UK, nearly half of all home WiFi networks can be hacked in under 5 seconds and almost a quarter are not password protected at all. And the shocking part is that 82% percent of these people believed that their networks were secure from hackers.

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billAs big companies like Facebook, AT&T, Google, and others have proven that their user’s information isn’t always as safe and secure as people assume. So last week, attendees of the annual Computers, Freedom, and Privacy (CFP) conference created a Users’ Bill of Rights. This bill should finally  give Internet users some peace of mind about what their information is really being used for.

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