In the past we’ve written a lot about PDF exploits (when a hacker or scammer sends you an e-mail with a PDF file attached and some compelling reason for opening the file). By now most people know that these are really viruses, especially when the e-mail comes from someone you don’t know or the file is there without good reason.
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A new type of malware has recently been discovered that not only gains access to your files, but also take access away from you. Known as “ransomware,” this virus works by taking control and encrypting your files with a 1024-bit encryption, a level of encryption that is nearly impossible to open unless you have the right key. And the only way to get this key is to pay the hackers a ransom.

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Stuxnet has been a major topic of conversation among Internet security and malware researchers, and for good reason. This new form of malware is designed to attack a physical entity, such as a power plant or nuclear reactor and cause it to destroy itself. And if that wasn’t alarming enough, this form of malware can be tailored to target a specific system for customized destruction.

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The most recent virus to hit corporate America is that “Here You Have” virus. It has been reported within the last few hours and is going around by e-mail. It comes with the subject line called “Here You Have,” so e-mail users beware.

If opened, the e-mail contains either a PDF file or a link that when opened will launch a windows script infecting your computer with malware and spreading itself to everyone else on your contact book.

As of right now,  the virus has already been sighted at ABC/Disney, Google, Coca Cola and NASA. Comcast was apparently forced to shut down its e-mail severs entirely after being hit with the virus.

If you have already accidentally opened the virus, make sure that your anti-virus or anti-malware software is up to date and run a full system scan.

(Via The Wrap)

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bank_of_americaWe’ve seen one too many ATM scams pop up in the news over the course of the past year, but this latest scam is especially disturbing because it involves a bank employee. In Charlette, North Carolina a member of the IT Staff at a Bank of America branch ended up installing malware onto the bank’s ATM machines. It has been discovered that he used the malware to make fraudulent withdrawals over the course of a seven-month period.

Many suspect that Rodney Reed Caverly, 37, used malware code that originated in Russia and the Ukraine. The code which was discovered last year, was used in 20+ ATMs overseas, is designed to capture pins and bank card magstripe data, and it also allows thieves to instruct the machine to eject whatever cash still inside of it.

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