ssn_logoNEW YORK-Well, despite the economy, we know at least a few physical security players have grown in the last few years. The Inc. 500/5000, a list of “the fastest-growing small companies” as defined by rate of growth over the period from 2006 through 2009, was released this week and includes the likes of VMS-maker Exacq, integrators Security By Design and Intelligent Access Systems, residential firms like Defender Direct and Pinnacle Security, and online distributor Brickhouse Security.

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hackedcarWith cars becoming more computerized and Internet-enabled with programs such as OnStar, the risk of computer-based security breaches also grows. Computer security researchers from the University of Washington and the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) have proven that it’s possible to remotely control many of a car’s functions by hacking its computer from a remote location.

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energizerResearchers at the United States Computer Emergency Readiness Team (US-CERT) say that the Energizer Bunny DUO USB battery charger is infected with a trojan horse that allows hackers to steal personal information from a Window’s PC.

Energizer Holdings ascertained late Friday that the USB-powered nickel hydride battery recharger was contaminated with malicious code, and the product has since been discontinued.

As of now the company does not know how the hacking was done. “Energizer is currently working with both CERT and U.S. government officials to understand how the code was inserted in the software,” Energizer said in a statement.

The Windows software included with the Energizer DUO is supposed to display charging status. After the software is installed, a Trojan that steals and transmits files is created. Even if the charger is disconnected from the computer, the Trojan continues to steal and alter information whenever the computer is on.

According to US-CERT officials, if you think your computer is infected you are advised to uninstall the software. Another method is to remove the Arucer.dll from Windows’ “system32 ” directory and restart your computer.

(Via Network World)

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pleaserobme2comPeople have become more and more obsessed with status updates; whether it’s on Twitter or Facebook, people are all about letting others in on what they’re doing and where they’re going and what exactly they’re doing. Programs like Foursquare, let users check into different locations and find friends that may be in your same location. The more you visit certain spots, you move up in the ranking and unlock badges and points, eventually getting to “mayor” status the more you visit. The more these types of apps take off, the more security concerns they raise.

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office-theftBeing in a busy office can make it hard to keep track of all your property. Besides the standard borrowing of pens and office supplies, some offices have experienced theft of personal property or information, and when it happens, it can be devastating. Whether your office already has a theft problem, or you’re looking to prevent theft from happening in the first place, there are a few simple steps you can take to increase your office security.

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More than 100 Section 44 stop and search areas exist in London alone

In the United Kingdom, police are using their power to “stop and search” on innocent photographers taking pictures of tourist attractions and in one case, even a chip shop. Section 44 authorization zones are areas where police can stop and search anyone without a reason. These zones were created to allow police to help fight terrorism. This law also allows senior officers to designate entire areas as stop and search areas. However, just because someone is taking a photo doesn’t mean that they should be detained.

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hackedThe U.S. is preparing a new report for the Congressional panel that shows evidence of China launching cyber attacks to steal U.S. government and industry secrets. Since these attacks are using a lot more resources than your average hacker would have access too, the evidence points to the fact that these attacks are not being performed by some regular hacker who happens to just be based out of China.

The report says: “The problem is characterized by disciplined, standardized operations, sophisticated techniques, access to high-end software development resources, a deep knowledge of the targeted networks, and an ability to sustain activities inside targeted networks, sometimes over a period of months”

These attacks have been made on government computers, including those belonging to the Department of State, the White House, NASA, and Department of Defense agencies. Most of the files stolen were defense and policy related which further suggests that it was a government doing this and not just some random hacker. The hackers also knew exactly what they were doing and had total access to everything. The report states that:

“Analysis of the operation suggests that the adversaries previously identified specific directories, file shares, servers, user accounts, employee full names, password policies, and group memberships on the network, likely during their detailed reconnaissance phase”

It’s a known fact that China has been working on strategies for “information warfare” for the last 10 years, which might just be the case here. In response to this and other possible threats the U.S. government has also been developing its own cybersecurity and cyberwar capabilities, most recently bringing cyberwar responsibilities under the leadership of a new Cyber Command, headed by NSA director Keith Alexander.

(Via InformationWeek)

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