twitterUsers of the social networking website Twitter have yet another virus to fear. According to these latest reports, there is a new worm related to a phishing scam floating around Twitter and it’s using the system’s direct messages to spread.

An already compromised account will send a direct message to another account with a body similar to:

“rofl this you on here? http://videos.twitter.secure-logins01.com.”

Once users click on the link they are asked to submit their information via a fake Twitter login page. And, once they’ve entered their login information, hackers use the compromised account to send a fresh batch of messages to all of the person’s Twitter followers. By luring unsuspecting users with “rofl is this you?” promises of a funny picture, victims are inclined to click on the fake link and thus subject themselves to the phishing virus.

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burglarJonathan Parker is like most teens nowadays that can’t stop checking Facebook. But for Jonathan, his Facebook addiction ended up being his Achilles heel. Earlier in the week, the 19 year old broke in to a home and stole two diamond rings. While breaking in, he took a break to log on to one of the household’s computers and check his Facebook account. Unfortunately for him, he forgot to log out. By not logging out, he lead a trail directly to him that the police could use.

Mr. Parker is currently in custody and is facing a maximum 10 year sentence.

(Via Mashable)

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facebook-fan-check-virusWord has spread through Facebook that the popular Fan Check application may actually be a virus. Many Facebook users who have downloaded the application have made complaints that their accounts were being hacked and sending unintentional messages to their contacts.

The application, which became available only recently, monitors the friends that comment on your wall or photos the most, and ranks them from highest to lowest. Shortly after it became available on the social networking site, groups already began forming asking for Facebook to ban the new application and warning fellow users not to download it.

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helpRecently, two young girls in South Australia, aged 10 and 12, found themselves in the precarious situation of being stuck in a storm drain. Armed with their mobile phones, they resorted to Facebook for help. But instead of calling emergency services, they simply updated their Facebook status. Fortunate for them, a friend who was online saw their Facebook status, and took it seriously enough to call for help. Of course had they called for help themselves, the whole rescue process would have been much quicker.

This is one story that totally boggles the mind. Could it be that kids nowadays are growing up with a mindset that social networking is naturally their first form of communication before anything else? It certainly seems so.

(Via Tech Radar)

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twitter_hack3As social networking sites like Facebook and Twitter become more popular with the public, they also become more popular with internet hackers. Recent studies conducted by Breach Security showed that social networking sites were responsible for at least 19% of internet hack attacks in 2009. Just last week, an employee of  Arbor networks, Jose Nazario, discovered an attempt by attackers to use Twitter as a command and control to send instructions to infected computers. Twitter messages are being used to send out new download links, which in turn downloads a password-stealing Trojan known as Infostealer.Bancos.

Aside from Trojan, a popular malware installing virus called Koobface worm continues to wreak havoc on Facebook. A report from Kaspersky Lab shows that these malware attacks are ten times more effective than those sent through email. The important lesson to be learned here is that attackers are going to follow more users as these social network sites continue to grow rapidly. This provides serious risks for users who share too much of their private details out on these sites. Posting information such as home addresses, exact locations, and even telephone numbers are not the smartest things to do when site defenses are potentially so weak.

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twitter-page1 The Twitter Security Dilemma

Your middle name. The first street you grew up on. The name of the first family pet. These are the answers we give to password security questions online without even considering the simplicity of the questions being asked or the availability of the answers to these questions in varied online forums. Everyone does it, from your children to the top people at powerful companies, and thus leaves themselves open to the whims of hackers. Twitter learned this the hard way when a hacker recently gained access to the company’s internal information and employee’s personal accounts through the vulnerability and simplicity of the “forgot password” security question.

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